Taliaferro ekes out win in close 29th ward runoff race

Chris Taliaferro

Ald.-elect Chris Taliaferro takes concession call from Ald. Deborah Graham

By La Risa Lynch
As Chris Taliaferro took the stage to thank supporters in his bid to bring fair and responsive leadership to the 29th Ward, he got the call from his challenger Ald. Deborah Graham.

Graham called to concede the race just after 10:30 p.m. Tuesday night. Taliaferro thanked the alderman and then said: “You are leaving the ward in great hands. I promise you that.”

Cheers rang up among the multitude of supporters who surrounded the alderman-elect at a neighborhood bar in the Galewood community.

The cheers were indicative of a hard fought and often heated runoff election that ended with the Chicago police sergeant garnering 52.12 percent of the registered votes to Graham’s 47.88 percent, with 95 percent of the precincts reporting.

“We have fought very hard amidst criticism. We fought very hard against lies, but we prevailed. This ward is in great hands because we will move this ward forward,” Taliaferro told his supporters.

Read the rest of Taliaferro ekes out win in close 29th ward runoff race

School-to-prison pipeline examined in student produced film

Mayoral candidate Chuy Garcia speaks at event in North Lawndale

Mayoral candidate Jesus "Chuy" Garcia

By La Risa Lynch
Mayoral candidate Jesus “Chuy” Garcia supports increasing more restorative justice program within Chicago Public Schools as a way to “create good healthy communities.”

Current discipline policies, he said, fuel the school-to-prison pipeline that disproportionately affects minority youths. Garcia added whether the school-to-prison pipeline is intentional or not, “it is structural and we need to stop it. We need to break it.”

“Unless we are able to do those things we continue with discipline policies that profile, that target, that expel and only exacerbate conditions of inequality in our communities…,” Garcia said.

Garcia appeared at a March 5th film screening and panel discussion on the student produced documentary “Restoring Justice – Chicago’s School to Prison Pipeline.” The screening was shown to a pack auditorium in North Lawndale College Prep High school, 1313 S. Sacramento Ave. Event organizers invited both mayoral candidates to speak.

Read the rest of School-to-prison pipeline examined in student produced film

North Lawndale a viable site for Obama Library

A version of this article ran in the Austin Weekly News.

By La Risa Lynch
Echoing Dr. Martin Luther King’s principal of economic justice, a group of North Lawndale residents held a Jan. 15th rally on the corner of Kildare and Roosevelt Road to stress the economic impact building the Obama presidential library will have in that West Side community.

“Martin Luther King had a dream and … that dream was that economic disadvantage neighborhoods would rise up and become those places where people could live out their American dream,” said Dennis Deer, of New Covenant Community Development Corp. “We believe Barack Obama has that same dream.”

Deer believes that’s why a prerequisite for the library’s location be in underserved communities was part of the bidding process. Deer noted the president wants the site to  benefit not just residents but entire communities.

Read the rest of North Lawndale a viable site for Obama Library

Treasurer Summers proposes investing in Black neighborhoods

City Treasurer Kurt Summers

City Treasurer Kurt Summers

By La Risa  Lynch

A day after taking office, City Treasurer Kurt Summers hit the ground running launching a 77 communities in 77 days listening tour throughout the city.

That tour brought Summers to the Bronzeville Dec. 5 where he met with residents and business owners to discuss Black communities getting a slice of the $50 billion pie the city has to invest each year. Summers spoke to a group of 50 at the Bronzeville Visitor Information Center, 3501 S. King Dr.

Summers told the crowd that his office manages a combined $50 billion in investments from the city’s treasurer’s office as well as employee pension funds and retirement plans. He said he would like to see some of that money invested in neighborhoods like Bronzeville.

“I don’t view a neighborhood investment strategy as a risky strategy,” said Summers, a product of Bronzeville. “I don’t view that as any more risky than investing in Korea’s debt which we do or investing in a cement company in Mexico. I don’t believe investing in Bronzeville is any riskier than that.”

Read the rest of Treasurer Summers proposes investing in Black neighborhoods

Residents want community benefits agreement for Lakeside development

By La Risa Lynch

Lakeside DevelopmentIt’s the last and considerably the biggest parcel of lakefront property  to be developed on the city’s south side creating nearly 140,000 jobs and more than 13,000 housing units.

But residents of the southeast side communities that ring the Lakeside Development want a community benefits agreement (CBA) to ensure they are not cut out of jobs or displaced by possible gentrification that could come to the South Chicago community.

“Our goal is to prevent gentrification…,” said Amalia NietoGomez, executive director of Alliance of the Southeast (ASE), a member organization of Coalition for a Lakeside CBA, a partnership of 17 community organizations pushing for the agreement.

“This CBA is important because we want the folks that have stayed in the community, that have built the community continue to be able to live in the community as the development proceeds,” NietoGomez added.

Read the rest of Residents want community benefits agreement for Lakeside development

Ray Charles immortalized on U.S. postal stamp

RAY CHARLES STSMPWASHINGTON — On what would have been his 83rd birthday, the “father of soul,” Ray Charles, was the latest inductee into the United States Postal Service’s Music Icons Forever Stamp Series on Monday, September 23rd.

“Frank Sinatra, himself a stamp honoree, once characterized Ray Charles as ‘the only true genius in show business,’ and certainly, if anyone was a musical genius, it was Ray Charles,” said U.S. Postal Service Judicial Officer William Campbell who dedicated the stamp at the Atlanta ceremony.

“Despite being blind and having a young life marked by tragedy, hardship and tremendous challenges, Ray Charles went on to have a remarkable 58-year career playing music that blurred the lines of jazz, gospel, blues and, in later years, country. In doing so, he became the personification of the American Dream,” Campbell added.

Born Sept. 23, 1930, in Albany, GA, Ray Charles Robinson was raised in the small town of Greenville, FL, where a local boogie-woogie pianist gave him his first piano lessons. At the age of five, Charles began to go blind. His right eye was surgically removed. While he  received lessons in classical piano and clarinet, Charles taught himself to play saxophone while continuing to listen to a mix of jazz, blues and country music.

Read the rest of Ray Charles immortalized on U.S. postal stamp

Posted in Uncategorized by admin. Comments Off on Ray Charles immortalized on U.S. postal stamp

KKK-Kin Killin’ Kin: Artist James Pate’s protest against Black on Black violence

KKK-Kin Killin’ Kin is artist James Pate’s private, but now very public protest, against Black on Black violence in urban communities nationwide. The Ohio artist uses stark charcoal drawings to visually compare Black on Black violence to that of the terrorism perpetrated against Blacks during the Jim Crow era by the Ku Klux Klan.

The metaphor is profound, Pate says, because Black on Black violence has become the new KKK, where Blacks are committing genocide against their own kinfolk. In KKK-Kin Killin’ Kin, Pate evokes a visual call to action to stop the violence. He hopes arts and culture play a role in that movement.

The self-taught, self-described “techno-cubist” uses a storyboard format to illustrate young Black men wearing pointed white hats, similar to KKK headgear. The images represent flying bullets suspended in air, children caught in crossfire. Those same images are juxtaposed with historical references to colored Union soldiers, Civil Rights demonstrations and ancient African imagery . The juxtaposition, Pate explains, belies African-American’s potential and the destruction of that potential. Read full story.

 –La Risa Lynch

Fantasia: In her own words

Singer gets personal with latest CD Side Effects of You

This article originally appeared in Austin Weekly News.

By La Risa Lynch
Singer Fantasia Barrino proves she can’t be boxed in.

Her latest album Side Effects of You is an eclectic mix of soulful R&B, heady hip hop and reggae beats that creates what she calls “rock soul.”

The Grammy-wining artist drew inspiration for her latest work from old-school R&B. She grew up in a musical family where Pattie Labelle, Stevie Wonder, Queen, Elton John and Bonnie Raitt were constantly played on the radio. Those influences are weaved throughout the album.

“I always like to give honor to those legends, like Lionel Richie and Aretha Franklin…because they inspired me,” Fantasia told the Austin Weekly News in a recent interview. “Even though I’m young, I am an old soul when it comes to music.”

Side Effects of You, released in April, debuted at No. 1 on Billboard’s R&B Albums chart and No. 2 on the Top 200 Albums chart. Listen what the singer has to say about her latest endeavor.

Read the rest of Fantasia: In her own words

Posted in Articles by admin. No Comments

When reporters do harm: Body count reporting

This article initially ran under the “We Are Not Alone – No Estamos Solos” campaign and was first published at chicagoistheworld.org

By La Risa Lynch

Derrion Albert’s death made international headlines in 2009 when the Fenger High School student was beaten by a gang of teens in Roseland.

But a story that got little headlines was the collateral damage the media coverage had on the community.

Communities like Roseland, Englewood and Austin are often penned in the media as violent and dangerous places, a stereotype with lasting effects on youth.

Read the rest of When reporters do harm: Body count reporting

Posted in Articles by admin. Comments Off on When reporters do harm: Body count reporting

Youth raise alarm on violence with Project Orange Tree

by La Risa Lynch
On April 1st a group of Chicago youth want to drape the city in orange as part of an anti-violence awareness campaign, called Project Orange Tree.

The group wants youth and adults throughout the city to wear orange to symbolize unity against gang and gun violence that has claimed so many young lives. The effort is under the auspices of the Lupe Fiasco Foundation.

The youth chose orange because hunters wear that color in the woods to prevent from being shot by fellow hunters.

“What we want is people to realize that violence is a serious issue and violence has been brushed off,” said Vernita Bediako, 18, a youth member of Project Orange Tree. “On April 1st we are getting people to realize that I’m wearing this orange so you don’t shoot me.”

Read the rest of Youth raise alarm on violence with Project Orange Tree

Posted in Articles by admin. 1 Comment